The SeQual Eclipse 3 Portable Oxygen Concentrator is the latest installment in the the SeQual Eclipse Portable Oxygen Concentrator series.

First introduced simply as the SeQual Eclipse, this portable oxygen concentrator was a unique entry to the oxygen therapy marketplace, let alone the portable oxygen concentrator marketplace. With military use in mind, SeQual developed a small portable oxygen concentrator that could run of standard AC power, DC power from a car, or even a battery.

With no other product to copy, SeQual’s efforts were in many respects, pioneering. As product development gave way to marketing and patient feedback, SeQual, as any good company would, improved upon their product.

As the SeQual Eclipse Portable Oxygen Concentrator worked a few years in the field SeQual identified some areas for improvement.

  • Software designed to switch the portable concentrator from pulse mode to continuous mode was re-evaluated.  The idea was sound enough, if the SeQual Eclipse Portable Oxygen Concentrator did not detect a patient breath during pulse mode, switch the patient to continuous mode. The only problem was, if the patient did not notice the switch, and manually change back to pulse, the unit might quickly exhaust the battery on continuous mode. Changes in subsequent versions of the SeQual Eclipse Portable Oxygen Concentrator allow the unit to check for a patient’s breath after it automatically switched to continuous mode, and change back to pulse.
  • The AC Power cord plug was located on the lower side of the SeQual Eclipse Portable Oxygen Concentrator, with a twist off plug. Many of the SeQual Eclipse Portable Oxygen Concentrators were sent back for repair of the power cord after patients accidentally broke them. The SeQual Eclipse 2 Portable Oxygen Concentrators had the AC input moved higher on the unit solving the problem.
  • The small wheels on the first generation SeQual Eclipse portable oxygen concentrators were convenient for sliding under the airplane seat, but needed to be removed to swap out a battery. Large wheel carts became standard for the The SeQual Eclipse 2 Portable Oxygen Concentrator.
  • The first generation SeQual Eclipse battery or power cartridge as SeQual likes to call it, had a blue tab that had to be pushed up as the battery was pulled out of the SeQual Eclipse Portable Oxygen Concentrator.  To make things easier on the end user the second generation SeQual Eclipse battery has a tab that you pull down on and out on for removal.  The new SeQual Eclipse battery is much easier to change, and the battery is easy to identify as well, as the battery tab is now black.

Most of the differences between the first generation SeQual Eclipse portable oxygen concentrator, now known as the SeQual Eclipse 1 or E1 and the SeQual Eclipse 2, or E2 is hardware related, cart design, ac power input, compressor version for example.  There were some software adjustments and firmware adjustments, but not nearly as many as between the SeQual Eclipse 2 and the SeQual Eclipse 3.

The difference between the SeQual Eclipse 2 portable oxygen concentrator and the SeQual Eclipse 3 portable oxygen concentrator, you can read more about that here, was 95% software, and only about 5% software.

To say the SeQual Eclipse 3 Portable Oxygen Concentrator has evolved is I think an understatement, today the SeQual Eclipse 3 Portable Oxygen Concentrator stands as the epitome of portable oxygen concentrator evolution.

Ever working to improve functionality and reliability for our friends on the battlefield or traveling accross the country in an RV the good folks at Sequal keep pushing limits. Future versions and upgrades to the SeQual Eclipse 3 Portable Oxygen Concentrator look promising.

Longer battery life, even better reliability, and a dramatic size and weight reduction are just some of the things we should look forward to in the next generation of the SeQual Eclipse 3 Portable Oxygen Concentrator.

If you have just finished reading Part 1 of Choosing the Correct setting for your Portable Oxygen Concentrator, you are now familiar with some basic truths about portable oxygen concentrators.  The first and most important truth regarding portable oxygen concentrators is 2 does not equal 2!! Continuous Flow Oxygen does not equal pulse dose oxygen.

All Portable Oxygen Concentrators ARE NOT CREATED EQUALLY!!!!

When a physician writes a prescription for:

Portable Oxygen Concentrator

2 LPM via nasal cannula

PRN

…and the patient wants to get that prescription filled  with an Inova Labs LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator, an Invacare XPO2 Portable Oxygen Concentrator, a Respironics Evergo Portable Oxygen Concentrator, an AirSep FreeStyle Portable Oxygen Concentrator, an Inogen Portable Oxygen Concentrator, or ANY OTHER Portable Oxygen Concentrator that is ONLY capable of pulse dose oxygen delivery,the Prescription cannot be filled correctly.

The great majority of physicians do not know that most Portable Oxygen Concentrators on the market use pulse dose oxygen delivery only. So when it comes to choosing the correct setting for your Portable Oxygen Concentrator, the patient needs to be enabled to make informed decisions.  ALWAYS CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CLINICIAN BEFORE CHANGING YOUR PORTABLE OXYGEN CONCENTRATOR SETTINGS. 

How does the patient or the patients family or the doctor help the patient in Choosing the Correct setting for your Portable Oxygen Concentrator?  One simple way to help choose the correct setting for a Portable Oxygen Concentrator is to purchase and use a portable finger pulse oximeter.

When you are Choosing the Correct setting for your Portable Oxygen Concentrator, use your portable finger pulse oximeter. Make sure you pick a decent unit, there are many cheap finger pulse oximeter mass produced in China now, and the quality and accuracy of many of the units, and I have seen a large variety, by and large stink.  Please check out the blog post on picking a good finger pulse oximeter.

First, get yourself into a comfortable seated position.  You need to address the Portable Oxygen Concentrator setting while you are at rest. With your portable oxygen concentrator on and a nasal cannula in your nose, breath in through your nose and out through your mouth (like you are trying to blow bubbles).  You will want to start with the setting that was recommended by your physician.  Inform your Physician ahead of time that you intend to identify the best portable oxygen concentrator setting, and by what method. 

As you are breathing on your Portable Oxygen Concentrator, watch your heart rate and oxygen saturation on your finger pulse oximeter.  What is the range your physcian directed you to keep your oxygen saturation at? Some doctors will specify a range, they will tell you to keep your oxygen saturation above 93%, some doctors want your saturation above 95%, and yet others will say simply over 90%.

Find out the oxygen saturation recommendation your doctor has specifically for you, and compare that number with the saturation you are receiving from your Portable Oxygen Concentrator. Remember, first do this test while you are at rest on your current pulse dose setting.  If the saturation is too low, you need to adjust your Portable Oxygen Concentrator setting to increase the saturation.

If you machine can accommodate continuous flow oxygen, like the Invacare SolO2, the Devilbiss iGo, or the SeQual Eclipse 3, you can match your stationary concentrator’s prescribed flow exactly, however, when on battery, the machine will not last nearly as long.

Once you have found the pulse dose oxygen setting that provides the correct oxygen saturation for you while at rest, you need to consider a different setting for exercising or walking around.  Ask your physician or clinician what recommendations he has for your prescribed oxygen while exercising.

If you were to walk with your portable oxygen concentrator on the setting you have titrated your self for while resting, what happens to your oxygen saturation?  How long does it take you to recover from your exercise on your portable oxygen therapy?

Using your finger pulse oximeter while you are walking can help you understand the correct setting for your Portable Oxygen Concentrator while exercising.

Some other things consider while choosing the correct settings for your portable oxygen concentrator

  1. Does your portable oxygen concentrator have enough extra oxygen to keep your oxygen saturation at recommended levels ?
  2. Does your portable finger pulse oximeter give accurate enough readings ?
  3. Where you able to actually decrease the dose of oxygen in pulse mode below the continuous oxygen setting of your continuous oxygen concentrator?

Now that you have chosen the correct setting for your portable oxygen concentrator you can really begin to enjoy all the benefits!!

If I had a nickle for every time a portable oxygen concentrator user had incorrectly selected a setting on their portable oxygen concentrator, …well, I would have a lot of nickles.

Often times you cannot blame the patient, the patient you see was taking direction from the doctor.  And while the doctor has most likely done a brilliant job on keeping current on new trends for his patients on oxygen therapy, keeping current on portable oxygen concentrators and new advances in oxygen delivery  systems is not the doctor’s primary focus.

So, who then do we look to for information on portable oxygen concentrator, and how to correctly use them.  The majority of Home Medical Equipment providers, while capable of selling a portable oxygen concentrator, fall drastically short of any useful knowledge of the portable oxygen concentrator’s best practices and best utilization.

What about those internet sites that popped up in the last 5 years, certainly they would now how to use the equipment they sell, or try to sell with CHEAP portable oxygen concentrator banners?  No, sorry.  Most of those companies are out trying to make a buck, by selling products they do not now how to properly use, and do not even stock.  Bubba sitting in a garage selling a product for a few dollars over cost, that he does not know how to service, that he never touches because some manufacturer let’s him ship directly from a warehouse does not know how the product works.

We have specialized in portable oxygen and portable oxygen concentrators since 2002. We started in medical equipment in 1990.  We have serviced nearly 10,000 patients, and patient education is a primary focus.

We find the best person to educate about portable oxygen concentrator is the end user.  True, we speak at Pulmonary Rehab Groups, Better Breather Groups, Pulmonary Groups, Independent Physician Associations, Skilled Nursing Facilities and other clinical groups, and while it is great to educate the doctors about the true performance of portable oxygen concentrators, we know the most lasting education we do is with customers and their families.

One of the first things to know about portable oxygen concentrators is they are all NOT created equal, and…that is OK.  Because five different portable oxygen concentrators can give you five different amounts of oxygen on the same setting is not a bad thing, …as long as you know that to be true.

One of the most common mistakes made with selecting a setting for a portable oxygen concentrator is simply taking the setting from the stationary oxygen concentrator and moving that directly over to your portable oxygen concentrator.  So, my stationary oxygen concentrator is set on 2, so my portable oxygen concentrator should be set on 2 as well right?  Well, no, probably not. Not if five different portable oxygen concentrators gave you five different doses of oxygen on a setting of 2.

So, I have listed just five portable oxygen concentrators, and there are a few more that I would use and trust,..one or two I would not let my dog use.  But as for the five portable oxygen concentrators I mentioned, you see a great difference in the dose of oxygen you are receiving.  Clearly 2 does not equal  2.

Now, here is the real fun part, what if I told you that each of the five portable oxygen concentrators I mentioned have proprietary delivery systems that release the bolus (dose of oxygen in a small short burst), and depending on the patient’s respiratory idiosyncrasies, one portable oxygen concentrator may perform better than another portable oxygen concentrator.

But that is a discussion for another time.

Please See Part 2 of Choosing the Correct setting for your Portable Oxygen Concentrator for more insight on getting the most out of your Choosing the Correct setting for your Portable Oxygen Concentrator.

 

MEDIF Forms.  What are they and do you need one for traveling?

If are planning airline travel with your Portable Oxygen Concentrator, either domestically in the United States or abroad, the airlines may require some information about you and your medical condition.  The FAA has set standards in the United States with regard to Portable Oxygen Travel, Approved Oxygen Concentrator, and information your Airline is required to ask of you before letting you board the airline.  Click here to find out more about FAA Approved Portable Oxygen Concentrators and requirements for Airline Traveling with Portable Oxygen.

So, that brings us to our question, What is a MEDIF Form and when do you need one? When you are planning to travel outside of the US, International flights may require your doctor to complete a Medical Certificate of Fitness for Air Travel, MEDIF, or FORM MEDIF,  which is an acronym for Medical Information Form.  Much like the Physician’s Statement required for Domestic Travel with Portable Oxygen Concentrators, the MEDIF is often customized to the specific requirements of the individual airline, however, the bulk of the content stays the same.  Usually the form consists of 16 to 30 questions regarding the nature of your medical condition.  There may only be a few questions that are pertinent to your oxygen needs, and the rest may be generic or disease specific questions that the Airline personnel would like to know in case they are required to assist you in flight and if you are capable of flying.

Expect to fill out information with regard to:

  • Physician
  • Diagnosis
  • Prognosis (for the trip)
  • If you are contagious or have a communicable disease
  • When you  will need Portable Oxygen , under what conditions..
  1. Portable Oxygen during boarding
  2. Portable Oxygen during Taxi
  3. Portable Oxygen during Take Off
  4. Portable Oxygen during Landing

Sometimes on a separate form, or sometimes part of the same form, the airline might have you complete an INCAD (Incapacitated Passengers Handling Advice) Form.  While both forms are standard, the INCAD is typically completed by the traveler, and the MEDIF is completed by your Physician.

Best Practice is to contact the airline you are planning to travel with and ask them about their polices with regard to portable oxygen concentrators on-board airplanes.

We know of some travelers who have had a bad experience traveling internationally on portable oxygen when their doctor told them they were  safe to fly, but the airlines specific policies regarding patients with medical conditions did not.

Who wants to buy a ticket, go all the way to the airport, and get turned away from the airline because they did not get proper notice about your oxygen therapy needs and your plans to carry a portable oxygen concentrator.

 


Cruise line Portable Oxygen Travel Policies

Cruise Line Portable Oxygen Concentrator Traveling made easy. Each individual Cruise line determines the types of Portable Oxygen Concentrators are approved for use on their Cruise Lines. As such, each cruise line has their own set of rules, and even documentation that may be required.

The basic rules of air travel also apply to those of you traveling with your portable oxygen concentrator by ship. Portable Oxygen Concentrator traveling just requires some communication between you and the party you are traveling with.

Some cruise lines may want to know all relevent medical information should there be an emergency, and require you to complete a MEDIF, or Medical Information Form or to be filled out and presented to the cruise line 72 hours prior to departure.

You will need to speak with the Special Needs Departement to find out specifically the requirements for traveling on a cruise ship with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator.

Be sure to match a Portable Oxygen Concentrator Rental to your specific needs. If you need 24 hour oxygen, make sure the concentrator you are bringing is for nocturnal use.

 

Airline Form Eclipse Evergo LifeChoice iGo XPO2 Solo2 OxLife
Carnival Cruise Lines Special Needs Dept Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Norwegian Special Needs Dept Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Celebrity Cruises  Special Needs Dept Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Royal Caribbean Special Needs Dept Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Seabourn Special Needs Dept Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Princess Special Needs Dept Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

 

As many savvy oxygen dependent people have discovered, there are deals to be had if you are looking for a portable oxygen concentrator, have you considered a used Portable Oxygen Concentrator

Since GoAssured began renting Portable Oxygen Concentrators  for traveling patients close to 10 years ago the locals new they could find deals.  Through years of experience, we learned that the most trouble free and worry free portable oxgyen rentals, for both our customers and ourselves, are those Concentrators that are the newest.

In our effort to ensure the most trouble free travel while on your GoAssured portable oxygen rental, we have created a policy that our rental portable oxygen concentrators can only be rented a maximum of 15 times.

The fact of the matter is many of the used portable oxygen concentrators are used sparingly by the people who rent them.  We recently had a SeQual Eclipse 3 Rental come back after a three week rental, and the unit only had an additional 22 hours on it.  The SeQual Eclipse  was there for emergencies, it was used on the plane out and back, but not much else.  The customer was very pleased, they had peace of mind knowing that if they required oxygen therapy, the SeQual Eclipse was there.

Often times we will retire used portable oxygen concentrators from active rental duty with only a few hundred hours, even though the unit has traveled abroad 15 times.

Some Questions you may be asking along the lines of  is it OK to purchase a used portable oxygen concentrator  from GoAssured?

  • Is it clean and sanitized?  GoAssured follows the same protocols as our Accredited Home Oxygen Company. Each used portable oxygen concentrator is cleaned and chemically sanitized with Hospital Grade, not available to the public, chemicals.  Filters are clean, replaced, and a Preventive Maintenance procedure is performed on each machine.  Following the PM, each used portable oxygen concentrator is bench tested for 48 hours, checked for correct operating parameters and oxygen output.
  • Is it under warranty? Unlike other companies, or private parties our used portable oxygen concentrator warranties are fully transferable.
  • Who will service my machine?  Should your used portable oxygen concentrator require service, simply call us and we can make arrangements to get your used portable oxygen concentrator in to us and one of our loaners out to you while you are waiting.

 

Many of our customers like the service of our Portable Oxygen Concentrator Program, and would like to have the ability to get free loaners, free maintenance, and a free upgrade path to a different Portable Oxygen Concentrator. Ask about our 5 Star Service Program, and for an additional fee, we can cover your Used Portable Oxygen Concentrator as if it were new!

Need to Rent a Portable Oxygen Concentrator for your trip?
Airline Travel Chart, Polices, and Forms

Airline Form Eclipse Evergo LifeChoice iGo XPO2 Solo2 OxLife
Aerolineas Argentinas MEDIF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Aeromexico MEDIF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Air Berlin  MEDIF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Air Canada MEDIF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Air Canada Jazz MEDIF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Air France MEDIF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Air Iceland Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Air New Zealand Form AT-9003A Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
AirTran Airways   Airline Specific Form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Air Tahiti Nui Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Air Wisconsin Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Alaska Air   Airline Specific Form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Alitalia Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Alegiant Air  Airline Specific Form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
All Nippon Airways   FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
American Airlines – AA  Physician’s Statement Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
American Eagle Physician’s Statement Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Austrian Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Avianca Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
British Airways MEDIF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Brussels Air  MEDIF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Cathay Pacific   MEDIF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
China Airlines Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Continental  Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Delta  Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Egypt Air Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
El Al Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Emirates Airlines Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
ExpressJet Airlines  Airline Specific Form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
EVA Air MEDIF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Finnair Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Frontier   Airline Specific Form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Hawaiian Air  Airline Specific Form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Horizon Air  Airline Specific Form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Iceland Air  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Japan Airlines  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
JetBlue Air  Letterhead Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
KLM Royal Dutch   FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Korean Airlines  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
LAN  Form Medif Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Lufthansa    Form Medif Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Northwest Airlines  Delta Specific form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Novair (Nova Airlines) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Polish Airlines LOT   FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Philippine Airlines  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Qantas  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Ryanair  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Saudi Arabian   FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Scandinavian Airlines  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Singapore Airlines  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
South African Airways  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Southwest Airlines  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Spirit Airlines    Airline Specific Form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Sun Country Airlines  FAA Rules Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Sunwing Airlines Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
SwissAir  FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
United Airlines  Airline Specific Form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
US Air   Physicians Statement Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Virgin America   FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Virgin Atlantic   FAA Rules Apply Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
West Jet  Airline Specific Form Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrators have a feature that is unique among all other portable oxygen  concentrators.  Built into the supplemental battery of each Life Choice portable oxygen concentrator is a surge protector.

The concept is great, who would not want to protect their $4000 POC from a power surge that could fry the complex electronics that operate this five pound wonder?  By design, the engineers at Inova Labs built an electronic switch into the LifeChoice battery to cut power to the LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator should external current exceed limits, or the internal draw from the unit exceed the capacity of the battery.

Anyone who uses a LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator should be aware of this feature and know how to reset the battery if the mechanism was tripped.

Two things we always teach our Life Choice customers,

  1. Never turn your LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator on with a cannula attached and in your nose
  2. How to identify and reset a tripped battery circuit.

In case you were never told or forgot the way to identify if your battery surge protector has been tripped, or how to reset your battery if the surge protector was tripped, follow these simple instructions.

How To Identify If Your Lifechoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator has a Tripped Battery Circuit

1) Plug the LifeChoice Supplemental battery into the POC, look for solid green light on LifeChoice Battery Indicator.

You should see a solid green light on the Battery Indicator LED.  WHENEVER YOUR LIFECHOICE PORTABLE OXYGEN CONCENTRATOR IS PLUGGED INTO AN EXTERNAL POWER SOURCE (AC Adapter, DC Adapter, or Battery) the Battery Indicator LED will be illuminated SOLID GREEN and NOT FLASHING.

If you have an external power source attached to your LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator, and the Battery Indicator LED is not solid green, that external power source is not supplying power to the POC.

If your AC Adapter or DC Adapter light is on, you know you have power to the adapter. If you press the yellow battery indicator button on the LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator supplemental battery and the indicator lights illuminate you know you have power in  the battery.

But, if you attach the supplemental battery to the LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator, and the Battery Indicator on the POC is not SOLID GREEN, your battery circuit has been tripped.

2) RESET YOUR LIFECHOICE EXTERNAL BATTERY

First, and most importantly, unplug the external battery from the LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator!! If the battery is not unplugged, the reset will not work. Undo the Velcro all along the battery, and pull the battery out of the case.

At the top of the battery, where the wire comes out of the case, you will see a glowing RED LED.  That LED only glows when the circuit is tripped, but it can be difficult to see inside the case.

On the same side of the circuit board as the RED LED, about one inch away, is a small red reset button.  PRESS THE RESET BUTTON!!

Put the battery back in the case, close the Velcro, and plug the battery into your LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator.  You will now have a SOLID GREEN LED on the LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator Battery Check, which means the LifeChoice is now operating again, on external power.

To find out some of the common reasons for the Battery Circuit to trip see our Troubleshooting  and FAQ sections.

Understanding the battery level on your Portable Oxygen Concentrator is essential for your health and well being.  You do not want to misread the power remaining on the portable concentrator least you will leave yourself out of batteries, out of oxygen, and out of breath! Today we’ll focus on the LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator specifically, but understand, the type of read out used on the LifeChoice is pretty standard on the ultra light portable oxygen concentrators.

With so many Portable Oxygen Concentrators on the market today, we will take a close look at the LifeChoice Portable Concentrator by Inova Labs.  The LifeChoice  is in the class of Portable Concentrators we call Compact.  The compact class of POC’s are characterized by a small on-board battery, usually capable of about 2 hours of operation.  These compact POC’s all use some type of supplemental battery, that is either attached directly to the unit, or can be worn around your waist.  The AirSep LifeStyle, Invacare XPO2, and Inova Labs LifeChoice are all examples of compact POCs.

As the most important thing in this class of Portable Oxygen Concentrators is the size and weight under 10 lbs, or just to be one of the smallest and lightest, some sacrifices had to be made as far as output capacity and visual bells and whistles.  For our discussion, the most important items left out of these Concentrators for their considerations of the size and weight was a detailed display of battery life indication.

On the Full Size Portable Oxygen Concentrators SeQual Eclipse 3 for example, there is a LCD display that clearly indicates battery level. You can simply look at the battery indicator and determine if you have 90% battery life or 20% battery life. The same hold true for the Medium Size Portable Oxygen Concentrator from Respironics, the Evergo.  In this case two LCD displays for each on-board battery allows the user to accurately gauge their remaining battery life.

There is nothing wrong with the way the compact Portable Oxygen Concentrators display battery life, you need only know how to accurately read and understand what LED indicators mean.

 

 

There are 4 green LEDs used to indicate battery level on your LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator, one for 25%, one for 50%, one for 75% and one for 100%.  Simple enough, but this is where some confusion may arise.

When the indicators light up all the way to 100%, the unit DOES NOT indicate you have 100% on your battery remaining. What it is telling you is that you have between 76% and 100% on the unit. So you could have all 4 LEDs illuminated, but only have 76% of your battery capacity available to you.

Here is a chart identifying the Life Choice Portable Oxygen Concentrator’s Battery LEDs and the relationship to battery capacity.

  • 25%         Indicator 1 = 0% -25%      Battery Capacity
  • 50%        Indicator 2 = 26% – 50%   Battery Capacity
  • 75%        Indicator 3 = 51% – 75%   Battery Capacity
  • 100%     Indicator 4 = 76% -100% Battery Capacity

Understanding the real battery capacity you have on your POC is vital, I hope you found this FAQ useful.

If you own any SeQual Eclipse Portable Oxygen Concentrator some basic battery maintenance will help you get the most out of your POC.

Like most Portable Concentrators, the Eclipse uses Lithium Ion batteries, in the case of the SeQual Eclipse, two batteries are contained inside a Eclipse Power Cartridge.

Generation one Power Cartridges with the blue tab, or generation 2 Power Cartridges with the black tab both require a little user maintenance to ensure optimum battery performance.

Both batteries need to be synchronized in order to work the best, and over time, one battery may drain faster than the other, and cause a performance issue.  So instead of getting 4 hours out of your power cartridge, you may only get 3.5 hours or less.

The procedure is very simple and should be performed about every 3 months.

DO NOT PERFORM THE CALIBRATION WHEN YOU ARE USING THE ECLIPSE, FIND ALTERNATIVE OXYGEN!!

Step 1

Unplug the Eclipse and insert the Power Cartridge you are planning to calibrate. Run the SeQual Eclipse at a continuous setting of 0.5 LPM to fully discharge you are calibrating until the unit alarms.

For a faster discharge you could run the SeQual Eclipse at a higher setting, say 1.5 LPM continuous, unit the low battery alarm sounds, then switch to 0.5 LPM continuous.

Step 2

Silence the continuous alarm by plugging in the AC power supply.

Step 3

Power Down the SeQual Eclipse while the unit is plugged in.  This will allow your battery to fully charge more quickly.  Once your power cartridge is completely charged, you can remove your battery, it is ready for use.

If your battery has not been calibrated in several months, or your battery was never calibrated, you may have to repeat the cycle a few times to get peak performance.

If you’re battery has been sitting dormant for many months, and you just use your Eclipse to travel just a few times a year, and it otherwise sites unused, it is best to perform this procedure prior to any traveling you may be doing while on portable oxygen.

Typical battery life for any POC lithium battery is 300-500 charge cycles.

Lithium Batteries perform best when stored at 50% charge.

About this blog

If you have any questions about oxygen concentrators, liquid oxygen, portable oxygen, you have come to the right place. Whether you are lookiing to buy a POC, rent a POC for a trip, or understand how what that alarm means, you have come to the right place. Since 1992 we have immerseed in all things Oxygen Therapy, here you will find not only a users perspective, you will find the technicians perspective! Welcome!!